Dreaming of Spring in Japan

cherry-blossom-bonsai

“Spring is in the air, flowers start to bloom the flowers in the trees.” When I think of spring, this song from Hallmark’s Timeless Tales Thumbelina pops into my head. Spring always makes me think of flowers and this leads me to think of spring in Japan. Continue Reading

Japanese poets in the garden

japanese-poets-on-bonsai

For centuries Japanese poets have been influenced by the beauty, magnitude and mysterious quality of gardens from their country. Their is an evocative yet subtle quality to Japanese gardens, that are usually depicted in an ideal landscape with a very stylized aesthetic and a precise perspective. Both in terms of the form and beauty, one can see the influence of these gardens on Continue Reading

Japanese woodland favourite

Kirengeshoma_palmata

Kirengeshoma palmata is a late-flowering rhizomatous perennial up to 1.2m high with arching stems and is native to the woods and mountain lowlands of Korea and the Japanese islands of Shikoku and Kyushu. The unusual name? No, it doesn't come from an obscure Danish botanist called Kirengeshom. It's really just a Latinised version of the original Japanese name. Palmata, a common Continue Reading

Fuchsia in New Zealand

flora-fuchia-bonsai

Fuchsia (named after Leonhard Fuchs, a 16th century German botanist) is a genus of over 100 species of shrubs and small trees. Although there are four New Zealand native species (colensoi, excorticata, perscandens and procumbens) and one from Tahiti, the vast bulk of the genus occurs in Central and South America.  Think of fuchsias and chances are the fancy garden hybrids come Continue Reading

The Art of Creative Pruning

art-creative-pruning

Decorative tree pruning brings innovation and artistry to gardens. It has something for all tastes, including sophisticated sculptural trees, modernist bumpy hedges, boxwood balls and lollipops. Author Jake Hobson outlines an approach to topiary that is more creative than traditional and positively encourages out-of-the box thinking. Instead of peacocks and rabbits, you will Continue Reading