Selecting Appropriate Scrolls for Bonsai Display

japanese-art-display

A 表具師 Hyougushi is an artisan that works in paper, textiles, glue, and wood to create a variety of products. The two primary products made by a Hyougushi associated with bonsai display, are 掛け軸 kakejiku (hanging wall scrolls) and 屏風 byoubu (folding screens/partitions). The reader will be introduced to the methodology of judging scroll formality, how formality is related to different scroll designs, and some rules of thumb regarding the cloths and the pictures themselves.

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How to Choose the Right Bonsai for a Unique Stag Do Gift

Finding a perfect quirky gift for a best friend’s stag do is not the easiest task in the world. It needs to be nice enough to make a statement, but unusual enough for the guys to appreciate it. Why not consider a bonsai tree.

Bonsai trees are the perfect way for a bachelor to remember this special occasion and the fun that he had with his mates. Before rushing out to make your purchase of just any bonsai, however, you might want to consider the following:

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Simplify

The tendency of life in our society is to become more complicated: Internet, television, shopping, work, family commitments, possessions, eating, debt … these things pile on top of each other endlessly.

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Wagashi, a simple Japanese gift

wagashi

Wagashi are Japanese confections served with tea that evolved through many centuries ago from the Chinese tea-house snacks called ‘dim sum’.  The word wagashi, derived from the words Japanese (Wa) and sweets (gashi), originated during the Meiji era (1868-1912) to distinguish the confections from European sweets.

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Bamboo Bonsai

buddahs-belly-bonsai

Bamboo, an evergreen plant that can be found growing in the woodlands of South and Central America as well as Africa and Asia. The Chinese see the Bamboo as a symbol of honesty, of eternal youth and Buddhist use Bamboo to help them achieve inner peace.

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Ikebana, the art of Japanese flower arranging

Ikenobo-Ikebana-shota

A Tokonoma is a time-honored architectural detail of many older Japanese homes. These alcoves occupy a corner in a room, and often hold a scroll, an ikebana flower arrangement or other artwork. More than a display area, a tokonoma is seen as a sacred space that is not to be invaded, and the seat closest to it is often reserved for the most honored guests.

Ikebana is an important part of such a display. First developed by Chinese monks in the 1500s, its principles were a closely guarded secret for many centuries. When the art arrived in Japan, this method of floral arranging was practiced only by Japanese royalty and samurai families. Much later, it became better known to more people, spreading eventually to the West.

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